Chase Total Checking®

App Review: Freebird Pays You for Taking Uber and Lyft Rides

The Freebird app will give you cash back for taking rides on Uber and Lyft. If you’re someone who uses these ridesharing apps, here’s an easy way to earn cash back from your Uber and Lyft rides.

Read out Freebird app review and get $10 free with our sign-up bonus code too!

What is the Freebird app?

Freebird is a mobile app, available on both Android and Apple (adding in promo code d7a12 during sign-up will give you a total of $10 off of your next two rides), that gives you cash back when you use the app to take rides on Uber and Lyft that you are already taking.

As someone who is a frequent user of both, I was intrigued when I heard about the Freebird app earlier this year. Now that I’ve been using it several months, Freebird has paid me almost $250 for my ridesharing trips!

Freebird app lifetime cash back

Related Articles:

How does the Freebird app work?

Once you download the Freebird app, you’re asked to connect your Uber and Lyft accounts to it. After you do, simply order your Uber and Lyft rides through the Freebird app and you’ll earn points for every ride you take which can then be redeemed for cash right into your bank account.

Additionally, Freebird partners with a ton of bars and restaurants, so if you take a ride to one of those places, Freebird will pay you an extra $4 to $5 per ride.

It’s worth mentioning that Freebird is compatible with any existing promotions that Uber and Lyft is running so there’s no need to be afraid of missing out on those discounts by using Freebird.

How to use the Freebird app?

After you launch the Freebird app you’re shown the main screen, go to your ‘Profile’ from here. Select ‘My Promos’ from the menu. Here, enter the promo code d7a12 for your new user bonus:

Navigating from the Profile to Promo Codes screen on the Freebird app

Once you do that and you’re ready to take a ride, simply go to the search bar on the main screen and type in your destination address. Your Uber and Lyft options will pop up and allow you to choose what type of ride you want:

Navigating from the search address to picking a Lyft option screen

How much does Freebird pay?

Normally, you’ll earn 250 points per ride, although Freebird frequently has promotions where you’ll earn more than that.

You can redeem them for a $10 cash reward once you reach 5,000 points, which equates to taking 20 rides. If you do the math, Freebird is paying you 50 cents per ride. Not too bad!

Points summary on the Freebird app

And as I wrote about a few paragraphs above, you’ll also get $4 to $5 for taking a ride to a participating restaurants and bars. If that’s not enough, Freebird regularly has promo codes you can enter in the same way as you do with the sign-up bonus.

All in all, there’s multiple opportunities to earn through riding with Uber and Lyft, going to bars and restaurants, and adding promo codes they’ll notify you of!

The Bottom Line

I love apps like Freebird because there’s no fee to sign-up and it doesn’t cost you any money. Similar to our review of the Seated app (where you get paid for just taking a receipt of your restaurant bill), you’re getting paid for things you’re already going to do.

Overall, this is a really solid app, which is why I’m giving the Freebird app 8 stars out of 10! It’s made even better when there’s promo codes you can add for extra cash back, so check my Freebird promo code list often.

We plan to review more phone apps in the future to help you make money while you’re spending money. If you want something reviewed, please let us know by making a comment below!

Do you agree with our Freebird app review? Are you using it already, and if so, how much have you saved?

13 thoughts on “App Review: Freebird Pays You for Taking Uber and Lyft Rides”

  1. Hey there… *Please read all the way through as there is a current warning using this service*
    I signed up quite a while ago in 2019 for this app. I thought it was a great concept and I love to share the wealth with folks in simply easy, even automated ways to save money. I even tell all the drivers I meet about it so that maybe they can give referrals.

    I had 1550 points. I travel for a work engagement 3x a year. I usually Uber or Lyft to the location from the airport. Over the summer, we took the kids and we drove the whole trip. Sometimes I’ll ride with a coworker who picks up a rental.

    I just had a work trip last week Sunday through Saturday. I ended up needing a Lyft “to” the airport this time. At the event that I was working, I was telling a participant about Freebird. He asked what I have accrued in the account. That’s when I was floored.

    I had 50 points from the trip I had taken to the airport but 1550 points had been flushed AND… HERE’S THE KICKER!… I had received a $5 promotion a couple years ago that I believe came when I signed up. So there was a $5 balance on my account.

    Apparently… due to 6 months of inactivity, they decided to start charging a maintenance fee. I don’t have ANY emails informing me of this. I haven’t bothered to look and I’m told this is in their TOS. Who reads all of their TOS? Studies have shown that it would take something like 17 days straight to read the TOS just from the to say 15 webservices used today.

    Get this… since I thankfully do not have a credit card attached to my Freebird account, they took from the credit on my account. The took $2.99 on August 14, 2021 and $2.01 on September 15, 2021… wiping out my $5 credit. I have NO EMAILS telling me they were planning to or even did this despite having 24 other emails in my inbox from them over the past 2 years. It seemed that the $2.99 fee was fine for the first month and NO ONE is concerned that my $2.01 payment was short $0.98?? They got the rest of their cash… that seems to be the concern.

    This 6 month inactivity and maintenance fee issue needs to be mentioned up front… it needs to be made clear otherwise (and I think even still) it’s predatory. “Sign up for our free service to make a little cashback (but we are going to charge you more than you’ll ever make if we can). It’s ridiculous. They should be able to make their money by skimming a little off of every cashback situation… and they can always include some sort of ad base as well to generate income. Incentives to keep using the service are terrific… I get it. I use it EVERYTIME I use an Uber or Lyft which just isn’t often AND… my boyfriend also has the app so when we do use it, it could be either of us who is logging in, thereby leaving the other in a period of “inactivity”.

    I just find this ridiculous. It sounded good in concept and now seems shady.
    Here’s hoping that they revisit this challenge and actually provide a well balanced service.

    Reply
    • Hey Mayra – I had the same issue a week or so ago. It kept sending me a reset email and then not recognizing it when I click on the link. I did some investigating over on Twitter. It seems like it’s an IT issue. Some people got it to work by uninstalling and reinstalling the app or updating the app to the new version. That fixed it for me, but others are still having problems with it.

      Reply
  2. Earning a good amount of money with Freebird since I use Uber 4 times a day to/from work. The recent app update makes it easier to use.

    Reply
  3. I usually take 5-6 short rides a day for work. That’s $2.50 to $3.00 times 5 days comes out to $12.50 to $15.00 a week of free money. Earnings by razor blades. Works for me!

    Reply
  4. I also found your site googling Freebird reviews and spent like an hour here. Awesome stuff! It’s like a finance advice with hot deals all rolled into one.

    Reply
  5. Thanks for the review! I just downloaded and will try it out this week. How does Freebird make money?

    Found your site on Google searching for phone app reviews. It looks new, but I enjoy the content so far!

    Reply
    • Hi Elizabeth,

      Freebird receives compensation from the bars and restaurants listed on their app. They could also be paid a small commission from Uber and Lyft, but I’m not 100% sure on that.

      Glad you stumbled on here – welcome!

      Reply

Leave a Comment